Tag Archives: community

Change the Community

Instead of leaving the ghetto, we are supposed to transform the ghetto. I like in a small, redneck rural town and my first response was: this racism is too much, I’m leaving. But instead of leaving, I want to be part of what makes my small town great for Black people.

 Despite being very white, at 90% of the population, my town does have a mix of Africans straight from the Motherland and a handful of non-white people who are in town for work or to attend the prestigious university from major cities across Canada. My goal is to always greet and meet any Black person I come across, and I extend that courtesy to other non-white people. It is difficult getting a job here if you are not white, and it is important to unite, network and support one another in the Black community.

   There are only 4 Black students at my college, 3 girls (including myself) and one boy. I have already established a social connection introducing one to the other, switching social media and phone numbers and meeting outside of school. One student is from Liberia, the other is a local and the boy is shy so I don’t know. But the more we connect and create a space in such a racially hostile territory, then the easier it is for other Black newcomers to the city to feel a sense of belonging and safety. 

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Twi Progress

Learning an African language is an important aspect of reAfricanization and one I take so seriously that I don’t even want English spoken in my house, just Asante Twi or other African dialects (I’m dating an African man who speaks both Twi and Yoruba). Learning an African language isn’t easy because I do not have the opportunity to practice my Asante Twi very often since I live in a small, rural town. 

However, if you are dedicated to learning an African language, there is a lot of resources and all it takes is determination, practice and discipline. I found that this comprehensive website is very thorough and has a lot of information, as well as being a reAfricanization website who’s purpose is to assist the African in the Diaspora in their journey. Here Here is a basic Twi language website that’s great because it has pronunciation from an African, and not some random bot. 

  There are a number of Asante Twi and other language apps. I use Twi Junior which is good for beginners, and Twi Proverbs which is just nice to have. My goal is to memorize the Asante proverbs I like. I also listen to Ghanaian music on YouTube although it’s not 100% certain the songs are all in that dialect, but the music is actually good and upbeat and puts me in the right mind frame when I’m studying Twi. The best tutorial on YouTube is GoldCoastDebuty. She makes learning Twi fun! 

I hope to be fluent in Asante Twi by Kwanzaa this year, and I believe in everybody young and old who are reconnecting with their African roots! We can do this! 
 

Nation Building

Today, after a morning in town, where I received scornful glances for wearing a Nigerian cloth headscarf, I dreamt of moving to Africa and being surrounded by dark, African people. I daydreamed about blending in with my sisters at the market, of dancing to the drumbeat and watching my son play soccer with the boys–children who looked just like him. 

  But, repatriation is not that simple for many Africans in the Diaspora. Especially, as a single mom in Canada, I’d be trading one oppression for another! I live in a town that is 95% White, which keeps me very aware of the unyielding white supremacist attitudes towards Black people on a daily, constant basis. But this awareness is not a negative thing. If you do not like where you are living, then make it great! 

   Canada has great potential for nation-building and connecting with the Motherland without making a dramatic decision like repatriation. I have visited the West Indies, US, England and France and I do like living in Canada. I am afraid of ladybugs, I don’t think I’d do well with flying cockroaches and geckoes. 

   But as a Canadian who is aware and empowered of my link to the Motherland and the connection to other Africans in the Diaspora, I know that we have a unique advantage in Canada to nation build, unite and conquer. We do not face civil unrest and economic struggles like in Africa, or violent racism South of our border in america. Black Canadians have education, opportunity and the added benefit of having the most diverse city in the world (Toronto). 

  I am trying my best to funnel my money towards African owned businesses, and Black businesses that are interested in solutions towards Black liberation by starting funds or charities, by creating art  or literature, etc. Some Canadians are way ahead of me

  But, on a smaller scale, we can be the change we wish to see in our community. In my predominantly white community, I have created a reputation for myself as an unapologetically African wombman. I may not be particularly liked or welcomed, but the community sees me and I particularly go out of my way to connect with the small Black community. If a small, white town can emphasize African unification; so can the main cities like Ottawa, Vancouver and Montreal. We nation build by uniting, despite our differences, so we may come out of bondage and start a new era where across the whole world, the African people can be empowered and be free from oppression. 

On Jesse Williams Speech

  I took to my Facebook page and Insta to display the amazement of Williams’ speech, in his steadfast and dangerously calm voice.

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   I did break down in tears, because he put out, in front of millions of viewers a message that so valiantly voiced the sentiments of the African Diaspora. He assuaged the pain and torment of the African experience with his powerful words. Just last week I penned Where Is Our Leader? We are all but bursting forth to fight for Black Liberation, to put at end, once and for all, to the inequality and wickedness of white supremacy and domination.

  I must thank Williams’ for helping bring the message to those who still haven’t figured it out, who are still trying to compete in a white man’s world and suppress their beautiful Blackness, and for those who think Blackness is thuggery and cool kicks. He may just be responsible for starting a revolution, and not a moment too soon.

Where Is Our Leader?

   

You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete. -Fuller

 

     If we are raising our beloved Afrikan children to be true revolutionaries, we must realize we are sending them to fight a war of greed, hate, capitalism and domination that may ultimately destroy them. We are sending our children out to be martyrs, not to be safe 9-5ers working at the bank or as a teacher. We are sending them out to create African banks and African schools. We are raising them to topple white supremacy that reigns across this Earth, from South Africa to Alabama to Papua New Guinea to London.

   Who wants to willingly be a revolutionary when our past revolutionaries were silenced, intimidated, imprisoned, tortured and assassinated or sent into exile? Who wants to knowingly inflict pain and suffering upon themselves in the possibly futile hope that the African nation may rise out of poverty and oppression and inequality. That we may participate in world trade, in government and in thriving communities? Is it such a futile hope that there is a revolutionary man or woman out there who can light the torch and lead the masses, because the masses are ready to be mobilized and a leader will rise.

   And once this happens, we must be ready to possess a revolutionary spirit and to unite, and show the world that we will get freedom, by any means necessary.