Tag Archives: liberation

Rap x Trap = New Message

Entertainment and art are two very important spheres that can transcend and define a movement. Right now, our generation needs positive vibes and we need positive, uplifting music. The new tracks I’m hearing in 2016 are a lot more mellow, sensitive and open-minded than the tracks that were out say in 1998 or 2000, like Ruff Ryder’s Anthem or 50 Cent’s What Up Gangsta, or a number of any other gun-slinging, hoe-slapping “hits”. These are truly hits, hits to the Black morale, to the Black collective, to Black unity–they were hitting us like bombs–because it’s not the message we needed back then and definitely not what we need now.

Instead, I’m hearing more about the beauty of the Black female and more bars discussing the tragedy of police brutality against our brothers and sisters. Future, Drake, Kanye West are showing that healthy relationships are not only attainable but desirable, even though we still hear the “H” word and “B” word. What I want to see is a call from these artists, both locally and internationally, to unite and uplift the people. We need messages of hope, cohesion and encouragement. Not encouragement to stay in the traphouse and grind, but to work on that degree, get married to a brother or sister and focus on what is truly important which is not chains, trips around the world or cars with heavy artillery.

I still don’t think I’m at a point where I’d allow my son to listen to rap music. I feel the overlying message is still very destructive to a young psyche. But at the same time, the face of rap has changed. It’s not about pimps and macho guys in bullet-proof vests. As we evolve and reach a certain collective consciousness about our reality and what obstacles we face, I hope our music can reflect that and offer a portal of entertainment but also a sense of empowerment and exclusivity. We need music by us, for us, that is relateable. The struggle is always relatable, but it’s time to take the conversation to what happens when we are ready for a new Black identity and how to fabricate that into our music. That needs to be our new message.

 

 

More Knowledge

There is something about being in a room full of books by revolutionaries and leaders of movements of liberation. There is a revolutionary spirit and it awakens you to the work you need to do.

I like to write, but what can I write if I am not continually learning and evolving? Right now I am reading one of my newest books Bakunin: The Philosophy of Freedom by Brian Morris. Dr. Huey P. Newton wrote in Revolutionary Suicide that we can learn to liberate ours


elves as the African people by studying the way other oppressed people have liberated themselves in their respective countries and adapt those strategies to our circumstances. . Maybe the past has the answers, and we have access to that information. Now, if only we can get in formation and all decide to do something about it. See you soon! 

Inside Out

To dream of Black liberation is to dream a fantasy. Even if we, our children or our children’s children one day taste sweet, carefree liberated life–we must always have a revolutionary spirit. There is much work to do, on a micro level and internationally to free the African people from oppression, from white supremacy and capitalism, from genocide, exploitation, slavery in the Motherland and in prisons, and from racism. Dismantling the system won’t happen overnight.

  And we mustn’t waste time. In order for emancipation, we must organize and preach like freedom is the Gospel. We must wake up our brothers and sisters in the ghetto; we must wake up our brothers and sisters unknowingly on the oppressor’s side doing the oppressor’s work and oppressing their own people! Our views must be militant. Our lives must be Afrocentric and resistant to white domination. We never know who we might inspire when we are proud to be African. We must never bow down, accept an inferior role or allow ourselves to accept discrimination and racist behaviour. We must vocalize and we must be courageous. It is by awakening the masses of angry, Black people that change will occur. It is a change that begins on the inside and changes the world around us, every village, city and nation.