Tag Archives: revolution

Inside Out

To dream of Black liberation is to dream a fantasy. Even if we, our children or our children’s children one day taste sweet, carefree liberated life–we must always have a revolutionary spirit. There is much work to do, on a micro level and internationally to free the African people from oppression, from white supremacy and capitalism, from genocide, exploitation, slavery in the Motherland and in prisons, and from racism. Dismantling the system won’t happen overnight.

  And we mustn’t waste time. In order for emancipation, we must organize and preach like freedom is the Gospel. We must wake up our brothers and sisters in the ghetto; we must wake up our brothers and sisters unknowingly on the oppressor’s side doing the oppressor’s work and oppressing their own people! Our views must be militant. Our lives must be Afrocentric and resistant to white domination. We never know who we might inspire when we are proud to be African. We must never bow down, accept an inferior role or allow ourselves to accept discrimination and racist behaviour. We must vocalize and we must be courageous. It is by awakening the masses of angry, Black people that change will occur. It is a change that begins on the inside and changes the world around us, every village, city and nation. 

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THE Speech 2016

Full Video AND Transcript of #JesseWilliams #BETAwards ❤

"Peace peace. Thank you, Debra. Thank you, BET. Thank you Nate Parker, Harry and Debbie Allen for participating in that .

Before we get into it, I just want to say I brought my parents out tonight. I just want to thank them for being here, for teaching me to focus on comprehension over career, and that they make sure I learn what the schools were afraid to teach us. And also thank my amazing wife for changing my life.

Now, this award – this is not for me. This is for the real organizers all over the country – the activists, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents, the families, the teachers, the students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do.

It's kind of basic mathematics – the more we learn about who we are and how we got here, the more we will mobilize.

Now, this is also in particular for the black women in particular who have spent their lifetimes dedicated to nurturing everyone before themselves. We can and will do better for you.

Now, what we've been doing is looking at the data and we know that police somehow manage to deescalate, disarm and not kill white people everyday. So what's going to happen is we are going to have equal rights and justice in our own country or we will restructure their function and ours.

Now… I got more y'all – yesterday would have been young Tamir Rice's 14th birthday so I don't want to hear anymore about how far we've come when paid public servants can pull a drive-by on 12 year old playing alone in the park in broad daylight, killing him on television and then going home to make a sandwich. Tell Rekia Boyd how it's so much better than it is to live in 2012 than it is to live in 1612 or 1712. Tell that to Eric Garner. Tell that to Sandra Bland. Tell that to Dorian Hunt.

Now the thing is, though, all of us in here getting money – that alone isn't gonna stop this. Alright, now dedicating our lives, dedicating our lives to getting money just to give it right back for someone's brand on our body when we spent centuries praying with brands on our bodies, and now we pray to get paid for brands on our bodies.

There has been no war that we have not fought and died on the front lines of. There has been no job we haven't done. There is no tax they haven't leveed against us – and we've paid all of them. But freedom is somehow always conditional here. "You're free," they keep telling us. But she would have been alive if she hadn't acted so… free.

Now, freedom is always coming in the hereafter, but you know what, though, the hereafter is a hustle. We want it now.

And let's get a couple things straight, just a little sidenote – the burden of the brutalized is not to comfort the bystander. That's not our job, alright – stop with all that. If you have a critique for the resistance, for our resistance, then you better have an established record of critique of our oppression. If you have no interest, if you have no interest in equal rights for black people then do not make suggestions to those who do. Sit down.

We've been floating this country on credit for centuries, yo, and we're done watching and waiting while this invention called whiteness uses and abuses us, burying black people out of sight and out of mind while extracting our culture, our dollars, our entertainment like oil – black gold, ghettoizing and demeaning our creations then stealing them, gentrifying our genius and then trying us on like costumes before discarding our bodies like rinds of strange fruit. The thing is though… the thing is that just because we're magic doesn't mean we're not real.

Thank you."

Where Is Our Leader?

   

You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete. -Fuller

 

     If we are raising our beloved Afrikan children to be true revolutionaries, we must realize we are sending them to fight a war of greed, hate, capitalism and domination that may ultimately destroy them. We are sending our children out to be martyrs, not to be safe 9-5ers working at the bank or as a teacher. We are sending them out to create African banks and African schools. We are raising them to topple white supremacy that reigns across this Earth, from South Africa to Alabama to Papua New Guinea to London.

   Who wants to willingly be a revolutionary when our past revolutionaries were silenced, intimidated, imprisoned, tortured and assassinated or sent into exile? Who wants to knowingly inflict pain and suffering upon themselves in the possibly futile hope that the African nation may rise out of poverty and oppression and inequality. That we may participate in world trade, in government and in thriving communities? Is it such a futile hope that there is a revolutionary man or woman out there who can light the torch and lead the masses, because the masses are ready to be mobilized and a leader will rise.

   And once this happens, we must be ready to possess a revolutionary spirit and to unite, and show the world that we will get freedom, by any means necessary.

Identity

  Yesterday we celebrated African Liberation Day by making it the day we started Mothusi’s locs. His locs mean many things, they are about liberation. It is about resisting White, capitalistic patriarchal domination and upholding a love and self-acceptance of the African identity. An identity we are currently working on, both of us. We are surrounded by the dominant culture and see what we don’t want to become. So creating what we do want to become is a conscious effort. I am not forcing anything on my son. Self-realization and consciousness-raising comes when the time is right. It doesn’t matter if he has locs and an African name or a Black Lives Matter T-shirt, it is about what is going on within. Once again, it is that internal dialogue and self-direction.

We become what we want to be, by consistently being what we want to become each day – Richard G. Scott
 

  Internal confidence is the root of changing our self-perception. It does not matter what the dominant culture thinks or how they perceive you. As a liberated, conscious Afrikan you must not be externally directed;  and instead, you must be guided by your intuition, your morals and your values. It is not easy when the dominant culture ridicules, abhors and demonizes anything that is Black in order to create a blind reliance and allegiance to what they decide is socially acceptable. This was never meant to include our African history and culture, our unique hair and beautiful melanin-rich skin or include us, as a people, whole. Therefore, we must look to internal clues to guide us away from what represses us, from what tries to obscure the visualization and creation of the liberated Black self, and we must realize this identity.

    When I step outside with my hair wrapped in a crown, I am met with darkened scowls and hostility. If my hair is in a bun or a neat ponytail, I am subjected to conditional love and acceptance, on their terms. No, thank you. I will continue to resist and continue to find the true identity of the liberated Afrikan woman. It may make you uncomfortable, but, that is your problem, not mine. JAH blessings.

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